Keeping Pets Safe During Car Travel

Traveling with your dog this Labor Day weekend?  The car company Volvo has released a report on keeping your pets safe while on the road.

The report is based on a survey of pet owners conducted with the Harris Poll organization.  Not surprisingly, the results show that Americans love to take their pets—especially dogs—on the road with them.

While we love to travel with our dogs (even more than with family members in many cases!) we do have some concerns about pets in cars.  This is especially true of millennials.

The survey found that pet owners will often leave their dogs at home due to safety concerns.

One of the biggest pet safety risks outlined in the report is unrestrained pets riding in cars.  Studies have found that loose pets in the car lead to distracted driving and other unsafe driving behaviors.

The report notes that many drivers would like to see built-in dog safety features in their cars.  Volvo describes the pet safety accessories they offer, including harnesses, gates, dividers, and protective grilles.

In the market for a new, dog-friendly car?  Check out these recommendations from Autotrader.

 

Retirement Homes for Senior Pets a Growing Trend in Japan

The BBC recently produced a heartwarming video about retirement facilities for senior pets in Japan.

When elderly pet owners enter assisted living and are no longer able to keep their pets, a growing number of animal retirement homes are taking in senior pets, many with special needs, to care for them in their final years.

But you don’t have to be a senior citizen to take advantage of these facilities.  One client profiled in the video travels overseas for work and has an older cat with kidney disease who requires regular IV treatments.

These homes provide the pets with lots of love and attention, including special services like water exercise, veterinary care, wheeled carts, and grooming.  Owners can get updates and check in on their pets via cell phone.

You can watch the full video HERE.

 

FACE “Animaltarian Awards” Honors La Jolla Veterinary Hospital

On September 29th, FACE will be hosting our Animaltarian Awards, honoring some of our local San Diego area animal heroes.  We’ll be profiling each award recipient in the coming weeks, starting with our friends at La Jolla Veterinary Hospital!

La Jolla Vet has been taking care of pets for nearly 70 years.  They consistently rank among the best veterinary practices in San Diego.

La Jolla Vet has also been a dedicated supporter of animal welfare in San Diego, including FACE’s mission to end economic euthanasia by providing financial assistance to pet owners seeking critical veterinary care.

Among the many ways La Jolla Veterinary Hospital supports FACE is their annual Paws & Pints charitable fundraiser held every summer.  This year alone $15,000 of donations raised at the event went to help fund FACE’s life-saving work!

The hospital also often sponsors FACE’s annual fundraising events, like our Bags & Baubles shopping event and Invitational Golf Tournament, allowing us to raise more funds and help even more pets.

Additionally, Hospital Director Stephanie Coolidge serves on FACE’s Advisory Committee, lending her expertise and knowledge about the veterinary industry to provide strategic advice and guide organizational decisions. Stephanie says about the hospital, “Animal welfare is our lifestyle. Not our job, our hobby, nor a fraction of what we do. It is who we are and FACE encompasses all that we believe in.”

Thank you La Jolla Veterinary Hospital for all that you do, we are grateful for your support!

 

Keeping Your Dog Safe from Toxic Blue-Green Algae

Veterinarians around the country are warning dog owners about the hazards of exposing your dog to bodies of standing water that have algae containing a poisonous bacterium known as cyanobacteria.

Toxic blue-green algae was responsible for the deaths of several dogs in the US and Canada this summer.

Veterinarians report that the algae itself is not harmful, but if your dog ingests water with algae containing the bacteria, she could be at risk for serious health problems.

The Animal Poison Control Center’s Pet Poison Helpline lists the following symptoms to watch for:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Blood in stool or black, tarry stool
  • Pale mucous membranes
  • Jaundice
  • Seizures
  • Disorientation
  • Coma
  • Shock
  • Excessive secretions (e.g., salivation, lacrimation, etc.)
  • Neurologic signs (including muscle tremors, muscle rigidity, paralysis, etc.)
  • Blue discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes
  • Difficulty breathing

There is no antidote for cyanobacteria poisoning, so prevention and immediate veterinary care are essential.

Keep your dog away from bodies of standing water that contain algae blooms.  If you suspect that your dog has ingested water containing this toxin, seek veterinary care right away.

For more information on blue-green algae poisoning, check out this post, including a video, on the Today Show website.

 

Meet FACE Success Story Tater!

This handsome fellow got into a bit of trouble recently when he got outside and was hit by a car.

Poor Tater suffered a broken leg and dislocated foot.  His mom needed a little financial help when the vet told her that Tater required surgery.

With help from a FACE grant and discounted veterinary services from VCA Mission Animal and Bird Hospital, Tater was able to get the surgery he needed.  (We also talked to his mom about the dangers facing cats that go outside.)

Best wishes for a speedy recovery, Tater!