Lost Pets and Pizza Boxes: NJ Pizzeria Owner Helps Find Missing Pets

The owner of Angelo’s Pizza in Matawan, New Jersey came up with a great idea to help find missing pets in his neighborhood:  posting lost pet flyers on pizza boxes!

He got the idea after a regular customer’s cat went missing.  Luckily the cat was found but John Sanfratello thought it was still a good idea to post flyers of lost pets on takeout pizza boxes.

As he explains to a local news station, “We want to reunite pets with their owners, but we also want other business to take up the initiative and do the same.”

Currently, they are posting pictures of another lost cat and a 10-month-old seeing eye dog in training who also went missing.

Here’s a link to a news video on the story, let’s hope other local businesses pick up on this great idea!

https://newyork.cbslocal.com/2019/07/17/we-want-to-reunite-pets-with-their-owners-n-j-pizzeria-puts-missing-pets-on-pizza-boxes/

 

Large-Scale Study Finds Cat Obesity is on the Rise

Researchers at Canada’s Ontario Veterinary College analyzed the electronic veterinary health data of over 19 million cats and found that not only do cats tend to put on weight as they age, but they also have been getting fatter over the past few decades.

The study, published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, found that a cat’s weight will gradually increase until it is around 8 years of age.  Male cats tend to be heavier than females, and spayed/neutered cats tend to be heavier than unaltered cats.

Purebred cats reach their peak weight between 6 and 10 years of age, while non-purebred domestic cats peak at 8 years.

The mean weight of cats has increased overall from 1995 to 2005.  However, weight has held steady between 2005 and 2015.

Researchers note that many cats in the study had only one weight on file, suggesting that regular vet visits where weight is taken are uncommon for many pet cats.  They say that cats can be overlooked when it comes to health studies because they go to the vet less frequently than dogs.

In an article on the study, the researchers urge owners to monitor their cat’s weight regularly, including at-home weigh-in sessions.  They note that unusual weight loss or gain can be a sign of a serious underlying health problem.

Check out this video on the study here!

 

Meet FACE Success Story Charlie!

This adorable Golden Retriever is Charlie, a much-loved military family pet.  Charlie got into some trouble recently and swallowed a razor.  His vets at the Pet Emergency and Specialty Center in La Mesa, CA told Charlie’s parents that he needed emergency surgery.

Charlie’s parents began to raise money for the surgery but needed a little extra help.  They applied for a FACE grant and we were able to provide additional funds that enabled Charlie to have the gastrotomy surgery he urgently needed.

Charlie is now back at home recovering with his humans!

 

Protect Your Dog’s Paws from Hot Pavement This Summer

We’ve all seen a lot of news stories about the dangers of leaving your dog in a hot car, but did you know that a simple stroll on the sidewalk can blister your pup’s paws when the weather is hot?

KUTV in Salt Lake City talked to a local veterinarian about the dangers of hot sidewalks.  He took a thermometer outside on a hot day and measured the temperature on a sunny sidewalk.  It registered 131 degrees!  In contrast, the shade temperature was just 80 degrees.

Paw blisters can happen in minutes, so to protect your dog, be sure to walk her on grass and in the shade.  Early morning is the safest time of day.

Click HERE for the story and video.

 

America’s Most Cat-Friendly Cities

We’ve heard a lot about what makes a city dog-friendly, such as amenities like parks and restaurants that welcome dogs.  But what makes a city cat-friendly?

Since we don’t normally take our cats out and about with us, are there other factors that make a place cat-friendly?  Turns out, the answer is yes!

Trupanion and Redfin recently teamed up to create a list of the top 25 cat-friendly cities in the U.S.  The criteria used include good access to feline-specific services such as veterinary clinics, hospitals, and shelters/rescues.

They also looked at homes for sale that had cat-friendly features like enclosed outdoor patios, room to climb, and extra bathrooms for litter boxes.

Another element considered was a lack of environmental hazards for cats with access to the outdoors (fewer parasites and poisonous plants, etc.)

Factoring in all these cat-friendly elements, the top cites for felines are:

1) Corvallis, Ore.

2) Spokane, Wash.

3) Orlando, Fla.

4) Bellingham, Wash.

5) Tulsa, Okla.

6) Raleigh, N.C.

7) New York, N.Y.

8) Dayton, Ohio

9) Clarksville, Tenn.

10) San Antonio, Tex.

11) Albuquerque, N. Mex.

12) Eugene, Ore.

13) Boston, Mass.

14) Allentown, Penn.

15) Dover, Del.

16) Columbus, Ohio

17) Boise, Idaho

18) Louisville, Ky.

19) Tacoma, Wash.

20) Lincoln, Neb.

21) Portland, Ore.

22) Minneapolis, Minn.

23) Knoxville, Tenn.

24) Santa Rosa, Calif.

25) Oakland, Calif.

The folks at Trupanion and Redfin remind pet owners that when searching for a new home in a new city, be sure to look at both the features of the house and the nearby facilities to maintain your pet’s health.