If You Find Baby Wildlife: Important Tips

It’s very common to find baby wildlife this time of year.  While you may want to spring into action and “rescue” baby squirrels, rabbits, birds, etc. when you don’t see their mom around, wildlife experts will tell you that well-meaning “rescuers” are actually “kidnappers”—taking babies away when their mother is alive and well.

The best advice from the experts is wait and observe…as this neat infographic from Colorado’s Greenwood Wildlife Rehabilitation Center explains:

Here in California, the San Diego Humane Society’s Project Wildlife program has great information on its website about what to do if you find wild critters in your neighborhood that look like they might need rescuing, whether they’re babies, injured, or just made their way into your home.

As a general rule, when you see babies without mom nearby, don’t assume that they are orphans in need of rescuing.  Keep an eye on them if you are not 100% sure that mom is really gone.

Defenders of Wildlife has these great common-sense tips to keep in mind if you find wild babies in your yard:

  • Keep your distance if you want to take a photo, or better yet, skip the photo session!
  • Keep your cats and dogs inside to make sure that the babies stay safe. It’s also a good idea to make sure that children stay away from the babies.
  • It’s OK to place a baby bird back in its nest. If you don’t see the nest you can place it in a small container in the likely tree.  It’s a myth that the mom will reject the baby bird if you touch it.
  • Avoid pruning trees and shrubs during nesting season.
  • Sick or injured babies should only be cared for by specially-trained wildlife rehabilitators.

 

A Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month Reading List

April 1st marks the beginning of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month, one of the best-known animal awareness events. There are lots of ways you can help prevent animal cruelty…volunteering at your local shelter, donating to an animal charity, or helping to raise awareness about animal welfare issues through social media…to name just a few.

Here’s another great way to mark the occasion, and catch up on some reading, too! We’ve gathered some of the best books about animal welfare and put together a Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month reading list. Click on each title to learn more about the books on the website Goodreads.

The Gospel of Kindness: Animal Welfare and the Making of Modern America – A history of the American animal welfare movement, from the 1800s to the 1950s.

A Dog’s Life: The Autobiography of a Stray – An award-winning children’s book about the lives of homeless pets.

Animal Liberation – The original (and many say still the best) book of the animal rights movement. A must read.

Born Free: A Lioness of Two Worlds – The classic story of Elsa the lioness, first published in 1960, but still guaranteed to make you cry.

Thanking the Monkey: Rethinking the Way We Treat Animals – This book covers a whole range of issues, from fashion, to circuses, to animal testing…and more.

The Lost Dogs: Michael Vick’s Dogs and Their Tale of Rescue and Redemption – An uplifting and heartwarming follow-up to a very sad animal abuse story.

Until Every Animal is Free – An overview of the animal liberation movement.

The Plague Dogs – The story of two dogs that escape a cruel animal testing lab, by the author of Watership Down.

 

“Humane Puerto Rico” Initiative Gears Up to Save Animals

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The Humane Society of the United States recently announced the creation of their new “Humane Puerto Rico” initiative. Puerto Rico is a commonwealth of the U.S. and according to HSUS, there are many dogs, cats, and other animals there that are in urgent need of help. Did you know that the euthanasia rate for shelter dogs and cats is 95%, and that many thousands of homeless pets roam the streets of this island?

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What will the initiative do? There will be a multi-faceted effort to improve the lives of the animals of Puerto Rico in several areas, including:

  • Training law enforcement officers and prosecutors on animal cruelty crimes.
  • Donating law enforcement evidence-gathering kits.
  • Cracking down on puppy mills.
  • A humane education program that will reach every K-12 public school student.
  • New tools and technology for animal shelters on the island.
  • Partnering with Humane Society International on low-cost spay/neuter programs.

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Puerto Rican government officials signed an agreement pledging their cooperation to help solve critical issues such as animal cruelty, the street dog population, and the euthanasia rate. HSUS notes that many tourists visiting Puerto Rico have been struck by the number of homeless animals in poor condition wandering the streets, and have contacted various organizations to see what can be done.

Interested in learning more about the HSUS Humane Puerto Rico initiative? Click HERE for the original story.  For an update on what’s been going on lately, including a contraception program for the free-roaming horses of Vieques, and the launch of the Sister Shelter Project, in which shelter professionals from several states will provide assistance to Puerto Rican shelters, click HERE.

 

123 Yorkie-Mix Dogs Rescued From San Diego-Area Home

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Animal hoarding stories are always tough to hear about. A recent hoarding case in the San Diego County community of Poway has gotten a lot of attention recently. An incredible number of dogs were rescued from a hoarding situation…123 to be exact (the number grew after animal welfare workers found additional dogs that the owners had been hiding during the original rescue operation).

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In this sad case, an elderly couple had been hoarding these little Yorkie-mix dogs in their home, and the living conditions faced by the dogs were, as you can imagine, horrific. The dogs are now in the care of the San Diego Humane Society, and it’s been all hands on deck caring for these sweet pups. They’ve needed grooming, dental care, vaccinations, and other services.

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They soon will be made available for adoption. San Diego Humane has set up a special web page to help field the many inquiries about the adoption process for these Yorkies. If you live in the San Diego area, consider opening your heart to one of these special dogs. You can also watch a news video about the dogs HERE.

 

Animal Lovers Rally to Save San Diego’s “Jetty Cats”

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Many San Diegans are familiar with our famous “Original Dog Beach” (one of the first dog-friendly beaches in the U.S.), popular with locals and tourists alike. But did you know that not far from Dog Beach is a Mission Bay jetty that is home to the “Jetty Cats”—a colony of stray and abandoned cats who have made their home among the jetty rocks?

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The Jetty Cats are not your average feral cat colony. Sadly, many of them are former pets left there by owners who no longer want them. Others are strays who have joined the group. They are quite friendly and approachable, and many locals enjoy visiting them and feeding them. They are also cared for by local animal welfare advocates who make sure they are spayed and neutered.

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The Jetty Cats are under threat. The City of San Diego and the USDA’s Wildlife Services Division have plans underway to trap and euthanize these much-loved cats. The stated reason is to protect endangered bird species in the area, but concerned animal lovers fear that this is an inappropriate reaction to what is generally regarded as a very well-managed cat colony.

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You can learn more about this issue and sign a petition showing your support for the Jetty Cats HERE. Interested in learning more about this unique community of cats? Check out THIS VIDEO from our local ABC New station.