Meet FACE Success Story Fenway!

This adorable furball posing with his equally adorable human family is Fenway!

Fenway got into a little trouble recently when he swallowed one of his human sister’s toys.  He needed emergency surgery to remove the obstruction.

With the help of a FACE grant, our friends at the Animal Emergency Clinic of San Diego were able to give Fenway the treatment he needed, and at a discounted rate!

Sending our best wishes to Fenway and his family for a long and happy life together!

 

Cute Alert! Meet FACE Success Story Coco

This adorable pup is Coco, pictured here with his very best friend!

Recently, Coco had a bad landing when he jumped off the bed and broke his leg.

Coco’s family was devastated when they heard that the cost of surgery to repair his leg was more than they could afford.

Besides raising funds on their own, Coco’s owners also reached out to FACE for help.

A grant funded by our supporters, including Life Sponsor Spearhead Captial, enabled Coco to get his needed surgery (at a discounted rate) from our friends at the Pet Emergency and Specialty Center.

Thanks to all of our friends and supporters for helping us save beloved family pets like Coco!

 

The Health Risks of Too Much Topical Flea and Tick Medication in Pets

As responsible pet parents, we want to do what’s best for our dogs and cats, including protecting them from harmful parasites like fleas and ticks.

But did you know that it’s possible to “overdose” your pets on too much topical flea and tick medication?  Veterinarians have seen many cases of pet poisoning caused by the over-application of these meds. We’ve even seen a few of these cases here at FACE.

What can you do to ensure that your pet gets the right amount—and the right type—of topical flea and tick medication?  Here’s what the experts say.

According to veterinary toxicology experts, most topical flea and tick treatments contain plant-derived insecticidal drugs known as pyrethrins (natural) or pyrethroids (synthetic).  Pyrethrin acts as a neurotoxin.

Over-application of pyrethrins/pyrethroids can cause serious adverse reactions in dogs and cats.  The Animal Poison Control Center lists these common symptoms of poisoning:

  • Profuse drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Tremoring
  • Hyperexcitability
  • Agitation
  • Seizures
  • Weakness
  • Difficulty breathing

The effects can be life-threatening if left untreated.  Be sure to read and carefully follow all dosage information listed on the package and talk to your veterinarian if you have questions.

Treatment for pyrethrin poisoning includes immediate removal of the product by bathing and emergency veterinary care.

One other important point to remember:  cats are very sensitive to pyrethrin, and spot treatments made for dogs should never be used on cats.  Canine treatments contain more of the drug than cats can safely metabolize.

Be sure to always use flea and tick medications made exclusively for cats if you choose to treat your cat.  This is especially important if you have dogs in the home and treat them with canine meds.

A little prevention can go a long way in keeping your pets both safe and protected!

 

Keeping Your Dog Safe from Toxic Blue-Green Algae

Veterinarians around the country are warning dog owners about the hazards of exposing your dog to bodies of standing water that have algae containing a poisonous bacterium known as cyanobacteria.

Toxic blue-green algae was responsible for the deaths of several dogs in the US and Canada this summer.

Veterinarians report that the algae itself is not harmful, but if your dog ingests water with algae containing the bacteria, she could be at risk for serious health problems.

The Animal Poison Control Center’s Pet Poison Helpline lists the following symptoms to watch for:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Blood in stool or black, tarry stool
  • Pale mucous membranes
  • Jaundice
  • Seizures
  • Disorientation
  • Coma
  • Shock
  • Excessive secretions (e.g., salivation, lacrimation, etc.)
  • Neurologic signs (including muscle tremors, muscle rigidity, paralysis, etc.)
  • Blue discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes
  • Difficulty breathing

There is no antidote for cyanobacteria poisoning, so prevention and immediate veterinary care are essential.

Keep your dog away from bodies of standing water that contain algae blooms.  If you suspect that your dog has ingested water containing this toxin, seek veterinary care right away.

For more information on blue-green algae poisoning, check out this post, including a video, on the Today Show website.

 

Meet FACE Success Story Tater!

This handsome fellow got into a bit of trouble recently when he got outside and was hit by a car.

Poor Tater suffered a broken leg and dislocated foot.  His mom needed a little financial help when the vet told her that Tater required surgery.

With help from a FACE grant and discounted veterinary services from VCA Mission Animal and Bird Hospital, Tater was able to get the surgery he needed.  (We also talked to his mom about the dangers facing cats that go outside.)

Best wishes for a speedy recovery, Tater!