Lost Pets and Pizza Boxes: NJ Pizzeria Owner Helps Find Missing Pets

The owner of Angelo’s Pizza in Matawan, New Jersey came up with a great idea to help find missing pets in his neighborhood:  posting lost pet flyers on pizza boxes!

He got the idea after a regular customer’s cat went missing.  Luckily the cat was found but John Sanfratello thought it was still a good idea to post flyers of lost pets on takeout pizza boxes.

As he explains to a local news station, “We want to reunite pets with their owners, but we also want other business to take up the initiative and do the same.”

Currently, they are posting pictures of another lost cat and a 10-month-old seeing eye dog in training who also went missing.

Here’s a link to a news video on the story, let’s hope other local businesses pick up on this great idea!

https://newyork.cbslocal.com/2019/07/17/we-want-to-reunite-pets-with-their-owners-n-j-pizzeria-puts-missing-pets-on-pizza-boxes/

 

New Study: Escaped Pet Parrots Living Throughout the US

A study of former pet parrots living and breeding in the wild (called “naturalized” parrots) was recently published in the Journal of Ornithology.

The findings show that our escaped pet birds are living, and in many cases thriving, in nearly all US states, including those with cold climates.

56 species of naturalized parrots have been sighted living in the wild in 43 states between the years 2002-2016.  25 of these parrot species are known to be breeding in at least 23 states.

The most common pet parrot species living in the wild in the US are the Monk Parakeet, the Red-crowned Amazon, and the Nanday Parakeet.

Most naturalized parrots live in three states with relatively warm climates:  California, Florida, and Texas.

A story on this parrot study in National Geographic notes that escaped parrots can live in colder states, thanks to their nightly nesting habits and people putting out bird seed in the winter months.

Parrots live in all types of environments, from urban to rural, with many choosing to nest in man-made structures.

Here in San Diego, researchers report that we have as many as 13 parrot species living in the wild.  Locals can keep up with the latest parrot news and report sightings via the San Diego Parrot Project!

 

Dog Lost in California Wildfire Found After 101 Days

The Ballejos family of Paradise, California reunited with their Akita Kingston 101 days after he went missing during last year’s devastating Camp Fire.

Kingston jumped out of their truck while they were evacuating, and the family never gave up hope that they would find their dog again.

Animal rescuers have been searching the fire area for months.  They have found dozens of dogs and cats lost during the fire.

Kingston seems to have survived by hunting and eating skunks, based on his pungent scent when they found him!

Click HERE for a heartwarming news video of the happy reunion!

Image:  Ben Lepe, Associated Press

San Diego Humane Society Shares Lost Cat Story with a Happy Ending

The San Diego Humane Society is sharing a heartwarming story about the incredible journey of a Bengal cat named Mufasa.

Five years ago, Mufasa was a kitten, living with his owners in Yuma Arizona.  He went missing and his owners never gave up hope that they would find him again.

Fast-forward five years to the San Diego Humane Society.  Mufasa was surrendered to SDHS by his current “owners.”  Standard procedure at the shelter is to scan all pets for microchips.  Mufasa’s microchip revealed that he actually belonged to someone else!

Mufasa’s original owners now live in Oklahoma City, and were overjoyed to hear that Mufasa had been found.  They immediately flew to San Diego to retrieve Mufasa, who seems to have remembered his first human family!

You can watch a local CBS News video of this amazing story HERE.

 

Animal Lovers Search for “Fire Cats” Lost in California Wildfires

A recent article in The New York Times highlights some amazing work being done by dedicated California animal advocates.

Many pet cats fled their homes during the devastating wildfires that swept through Sonoma County.  Quite a few of these cats remain missing.

A woman named Jennifer Petruska has made it her mission to track these cats down every night since the fires.  So far, she and her team have found more than 70 cats, but they believe dozens more remain lost.

This volunteer group calls itself Pet Rescue & Reunification.  They set up night vision cameras and traps with food in places the lost cats are thought to be hiding.  The traps are checked every hour until morning.

Many people who lost their homes and all their possessions in the fires are still heartsick over the loss of their cats.  Animal experts say that cats flee danger by instinct and can survive in hiding for weeks.  This gives rescuers and owners hope that the cats are still alive.

A few found cats have yet to be claimed by anyone and are being housed at the Sonoma County Animal Services Department.

Images:  Jim Wilson/The New York Times.