Meet FACE Success Story Fenway!

This adorable furball posing with his equally adorable human family is Fenway!

Fenway got into a little trouble recently when he swallowed one of his human sister’s toys.  He needed emergency surgery to remove the obstruction.

With the help of a FACE grant, our friends at the Animal Emergency Clinic of San Diego were able to give Fenway the treatment he needed, and at a discounted rate!

Sending our best wishes to Fenway and his family for a long and happy life together!

 

Video Outlines Mental Health Crisis Among Veterinary Professionals

A sobering new video produced by Dr. Carrie Turnbull of the Staunton River Veterinary Clinic in Virginia might come as a surprise to many pet owners.

The suicide rate among veterinarians is significantly higher than the rate for the general population.  One study conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that female veterinarians are 3.5 times and male veterinarians 2.1 times as likely to die from suicide than the general population.

Dr. Turnbull notes in her video that many veterinarians tend to be high-achiever, type A personality types, and they are strongly affected by the stressors inherent in their jobs, such as unsuccessful treatments and patient deaths.

She also notes that vets can experience financial stress and many carry a significant amount of debt for years after veterinary school.

Do you have friends or family in the veterinary profession?  Dr. Turnbull recommends checking in with them to see how they are doing and if they are getting the help and support that they need.

You can watch Dr. Turnbull’s video below and learn more about this issue on the American Veterinary Medical Association’s website HERE.  There is also a Facebook group called Not One More Vet that provides help for vets in need of support.

 

Cute Alert! Meet FACE Success Story Coco

This adorable pup is Coco, pictured here with his very best friend!

Recently, Coco had a bad landing when he jumped off the bed and broke his leg.

Coco’s family was devastated when they heard that the cost of surgery to repair his leg was more than they could afford.

Besides raising funds on their own, Coco’s owners also reached out to FACE for help.

A grant funded by our supporters, including Life Sponsor Spearhead Captial, enabled Coco to get his needed surgery (at a discounted rate) from our friends at the Pet Emergency and Specialty Center.

Thanks to all of our friends and supporters for helping us save beloved family pets like Coco!

 

The Health Risks of Too Much Topical Flea and Tick Medication in Pets

As responsible pet parents, we want to do what’s best for our dogs and cats, including protecting them from harmful parasites like fleas and ticks.

But did you know that it’s possible to “overdose” your pets on too much topical flea and tick medication?  Veterinarians have seen many cases of pet poisoning caused by the over-application of these meds. We’ve even seen a few of these cases here at FACE.

What can you do to ensure that your pet gets the right amount—and the right type—of topical flea and tick medication?  Here’s what the experts say.

According to veterinary toxicology experts, most topical flea and tick treatments contain plant-derived insecticidal drugs known as pyrethrins (natural) or pyrethroids (synthetic).  Pyrethrin acts as a neurotoxin.

Over-application of pyrethrins/pyrethroids can cause serious adverse reactions in dogs and cats.  The Animal Poison Control Center lists these common symptoms of poisoning:

  • Profuse drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Tremoring
  • Hyperexcitability
  • Agitation
  • Seizures
  • Weakness
  • Difficulty breathing

The effects can be life-threatening if left untreated.  Be sure to read and carefully follow all dosage information listed on the package and talk to your veterinarian if you have questions.

Treatment for pyrethrin poisoning includes immediate removal of the product by bathing and emergency veterinary care.

One other important point to remember:  cats are very sensitive to pyrethrin, and spot treatments made for dogs should never be used on cats.  Canine treatments contain more of the drug than cats can safely metabolize.

Be sure to always use flea and tick medications made exclusively for cats if you choose to treat your cat.  This is especially important if you have dogs in the home and treat them with canine meds.

A little prevention can go a long way in keeping your pets both safe and protected!

 

“Feline Grimace Scale” Helps Vets Determine Your Cat’s Pain

Cats are very good at hiding their pain.  It can be difficult for owners and vets to determine the severity of a cat’s pain, and many often look to body language as a key.

Besides the position in which they hold their bodies, a cat’s face can also show signs of pain.  A cat’s facial muscle structure does not allow for the kind of facial expressions seen in dogs, but there are ways to read signs of pain.

Veterinarians at the University of Montreal have developed a “Feline Grimace Scale” which allows vets to examine and rate 5 facial actions to determine pain on a scale of 0 to 10.  The actions are:

  • Ear position
  • Eye tightening
  • Muzzle tension
  • Whisker position
  • Head position

Vets can assess each element to determine the level of pain.  For example, ears perked upwards and facing forward indicate no pain while ears flattened and rotated outwards indicate some degree of pain.

Check out this summary of the Feline Grimace Scale (including helpful visual aid illustrations) published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.