The 8 Most Common Canine Health Problems

A large-scale study of dogs in the UK has identified the most common canine health disorders seen by veterinarians.

The electronic health data of over 450,000 dogs under veterinary care in the UK was analyzed by researchers conducting this study.

Let’s take a look at some key findings.  Be sure to check out the full report, published in BMC Veterinary Research HERE.

The 8 most common canine health problems are:

  • Anal sac disorder
  • Conjunctivitis (eye infection)
  • Dental disease
  • Dermatitis (skin problems)
  • Overweight or obese
  • Lipoma (fatty tissue growth)
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Otitis externa (ear infection)

The researchers note that some of these health conditions are more prevalent than others, while some tend to be more severe or longer lasting than others.

Most prevalent health issues:

  • Dental disease
  • Overweight or obese
  • Anal sac disorder

Most severe health problems:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Otitis externa
  • Dermatitis

Health issues with longest duration:

  • Dental disease
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Overweight or obese

Which canine health disorders were found to have the greatest overall negative impact on a dog’s well-being?

  • Dental disease
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Overweight or obese

The good news is that many of the most common canine health problems are preventable!  Regular dental care, both at home and at the vet’s office, is essential to your dog’s dental health.

Keeping your dog at a healthy weight through proper diet and exercise can prevent obesity and other associated health problems.  A healthy body weight can also help ease the discomfort of arthritis.

Be sure to talk to your vet about ways you can work together to maintain your dog’s health and prevent these common health problems.

 

Meet FACE Success Story Zeus!

This handsome fellow is a 9 month old Siberian Husky pup named Zeus.  Zeus and his human dad were unfortunately involved in a car accident recently.  The car was totaled but luckily Zeus’s dad was unhurt.

Zeus initially seemed fine too, although he was tossed about a little in the back seat.  It was only later at home that he began to show signs that he was unwell.  His veterinarian diagnosed Zeus with intussusception, a condition where one segment of the intestines slides (or “telescopes”) into another.

Zeus required surgery to fix his urgent medical problem, and the combination of an unexpected car accident and a veterinary emergency were financially difficult for his family to handle.

With the help of a grant from FACE, Zeus was able to get the surgery he needed and is now back at home recovering with his family!

 

Tips on Reducing the Stress of Vet Visits for Your Dog

The website Companion Animal Psychology is a great resource for dog and cat owners interested in learning how to better understand their pets.

The site recently published some helpful advice on how to ensure that your dog is as calm as possible during trips to the vet’s office.  The tips are based on research published in the journal Applied Animal Behaviour Science, which you can find HERE.

The researchers found that many factors can increase your dog’s stress at the vet, including prior negative experiences, the dog’s individual genetic makeup, and upsetting sights, sounds, smells, etc. at the vet.

Another cause of fear is something called “trigger stacking”—the combination of stressful experiences that can go into a vet visit (being put in a carrier, being restrained, etc.).

Here are just a few recommendations for helping dogs that feel anxiety about going to the vet.  Be sure to read the full article for more information!

  • Avoid feeding before a visit so your dog will be interested in treats given by staff at the vet’s office.  Treats are good rewards after unpleasant procedures like vaccinations.
  • Bring a blanket or toys from home to help comfort your dog.
  • Stay with your dog during the exam/consultation, and any other procedures if possible.

  • Get your dog used to car rides, carriers, and routine physical handling before trips to the vet.  Nail trimming and ear cleaning at the vet’s office can help accustom your dog to being there.
  • Very stressed dogs can wait in the car rather than the waiting room.  Muzzles and sedation can also be helpful in extreme cases.

 

May is Pet Cancer Awareness Month

Just like humans, our dogs, cats, and other pets can suffer from many different kinds of cancer.  Studies of canine cancer suggest that as many as half of dogs over 10 years old will develop some form of cancer.

In recognition of Pet Cancer Awareness Month, here is a list of common signs and symptoms of cancer in dogs, cats, and other animals–courtesy of the American Veterinary Medical Association:

  • Abdominal swelling
  • Bleeding from the mouth, nose or other body openings
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Difficulty eating
  • Lumps, bumps or discolored skin

  • Non-healing wounds
  • Persistent diarrhea or vomiting
  • Sudden changes in weight
  • Unexplained swelling, heat, pain or lameness
  • Visible mass/tumor

Be sure to talk to your vet if you think your pet may be experiencing one or more of these issues.   Annual veterinary wellness exams are also a good way for your vet to check for any of these signs on a regular basis.

For more information on the diagnosis and treatment of veterinary cancer, including how to find a veterinary oncologist in your area, visit the pet owners section of the Veterinary Cancer Society website.