How Our Personalities Affect Our Cats’ Care and Well-Being

A new research study on personality type and cat ownership provides some interesting insights into how our personalities can impact our cats’ lives.

Researchers surveyed over 3,000 UK cat owners on their personality types based on the “Big Five Inventory”

  • Agreeableness
  • Conscientiousness
  • Extroversion
  • Neuroticism
  • Openness

They also asked the owners several questions about how they cared for their cats.  The findings show that our personality types play a big role in how we relate to our cats.

For example, owners identified as having high neuroticism were more likely to keep their cats indoors.  They were also more likely to report behavior problems such as anxiety and obesity in their cats.

In contrast, the researchers found that extroverted owners were more likely to let their cats have access to the outdoors.

Owners identified as agreeable reported greater overall satisfaction with their cats and were also more likely to identify their cats as being at a normal weight.

Conscientious owners tended to view their cats as more outgoing and less anxious, fearful, or aloof than other owner types.

The researchers note that these findings are similar to other studies on parental personality type and child rearing practices.  Not surprisingly, parents identified as “neurotic” are more likely to have overprotective caregiving styles that can cause stress in their children.

For more information on pet parenting styles, check out this article from Science Daily.

 

Restraining Your Dog While Driving

Why should you buckle up your dog?

According to Jennifer Davidson, the Manager of Traffic Advocacy at AAA, “people don’t realize how important it is to buckle up their dog. An unrestrained pet can become a hazardous projectile in the event of an accident or sudden stop, injuring himself, the driver and passengers.”

Furthermore, Davidson explains that an unrestrained, 10-lb. dog in a crash at 50 mph will exert approximately 500 lbs. of force, while an unrestrained, 90-lb. dog like the Feldmans’ dog Sally, traveling in a car at 30 mph in a crash, will exert about 2700 pounds of force.

The best gear to buckle up your pet

To protect a pet, the driver and other passengers, Davidson recommends that pet-owning drivers use a body harness specifically made for the car travel.

“As long as the dogs are belted in, a well- constructed body harness spreads the crash forces across the dog body,” explains Carl Goldberg, inventor of the Roadie Canine Vehicle Restraint Dog Car Harness/Seat Belt.

Goldberg first conceived of the Roadie after he slammed on his brakes to avoid a collision. As a result, his 100-lb. chocolate Lab was ejected from the seat and thrown into the windshield. Fortunately, Goldberg, his daughter or dog were not injured.

Originally, Goldberg designed the product with the help of a veterinary orthopedic surgeon and design engineer because he realized the importance of producing a canine restraint harness that would not choke or injure an animal upon impact. Over the years, he has slightly modified the product to enhance the quality as well as to have a better fitting product. Currently, the product is made in the USA in association with CoverCraft.

When asked why a harness is preferable to a crate when traveling by car, both Davidson and Goldberg agree that a secured crate could explode because a dog could hit the inside walls with such force that the crate could open up and the dog would be thrown out of the car.

Full Article on ZooToo

Dog hero saves family from fire

South Park, PA –  

This past weekend, Raven, an American Bulldog, proved to her family, in no uncertain terms, that dog is man’s best friend.

According to CBS Pittsburgh, the heroic dog successfully alerted her slumbering family to a blaze in their Piney Fork Road home in the early morning hours on Sunday.

While working smoke detectors are considered the gold standard for alerting homeowners to fires, time and again, we read about dogs who are credited with saving their family’s lives as their heightened senses alert them to danger long before it is otherwise apparent.

Raven is no exception.

Her family is grateful to her – calling the 7 yr-old dog “amazing”.

Good girl Raven!

Continue reading on Examiner.com Dog hero saves family from fire – National Dogs | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/dogs-in-national/dog-hero-saves-family-from-fire#ixzz1oNjMbtyV