(Almost) Wordless Wednesday: Meet Beast!

6 month old FACE Success Story Beast needed emergency surgery after ingesting a foreign object…one of our most common veterinary emergencies!

Beast’s family reached out to FACE for financial assistance and we were happy to help this cute little guy get the surgery he so urgently needed!

 

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Happy National Puppy Day from FACE Success Story Dallas!

In honor of National Puppy Day, we’d like to introduce you to Dallas!

This adorable Border Collie was injured after playing with a much larger Golden Retriever. At only 6 months old, Dallas desperately needed surgery to repair the fracture in his leg.

His owner had just moved to San Diego and taken Dallas in as his own when he found him as a stray. Thankfully, Dallas’s “dad” reached out to us and also fund-raised on his own for Dallas’s care. We’re happy to report that this pup is back to playing with all his furry friends!

 

Here are the Top Dog Names for 2017!

If it’s January, it must be time for a little fun pet news from the folks at rover.com.  Yes, they announced the most popular male and female dog names for 2017!

Here are the names that Rover found to be most popular, after analyzing their client database:

Top Female Dog Names for 2017:

  • Bella
  • Lucy
  • Daisy
  • Luna
  • Lola
  • Sadie
  • Molly
  • Maggie
  • Bailey
  • Sophie

Top Male Dog Names for 2017:

  • Max
  • Charlie
  • Cooper
  • Buddy
  • Jack
  • Rocky
  • Oliver
  • Bear
  • Duke
  • Tucker

A few fun dog name facts:

  • 44% of all dog names are also human names.
  • People are naming their dogs Barb and Eleven after characters from Stranger Things.
  • The latest Star Wars series is inspiring newly popular names like Finn and Rey.

Be sure to check out rover.com for the full lists of the 100 most popular female and male dog names!

 

British Veterinary Association Launches #BreedtoBreathe Awareness Campaign

With the growing popularity of brachycephalic (short-nosed) dog breeds like French Bulldogs and Pugs, veterinarians are increasingly concerned about the health and well-being of these dogs.

Many short-muzzled dogs suffer from a condition called BOAS (brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome).  Symptoms include respiratory noise, narrowed nostrils, gastrointestinal problems, sleep apnea, heat intolerance, cyanosis (low oxygen), and collapse.

The British Veterinary Association has recently announced its new #BreedtoBreathe campaign, which seeks to raise awareness about the health problems of brachycephalic breeds.

You can read the BVA’s official policy statement on brachycephalic dogs HERE.  In it, they outline their concern about breeding practices (and advertising campaigns) that promote brachycephalic dogs, and provide guidance for vets on how to raise awareness about the health problems of short-muzzled dogs with clients.

The #BreedtoBreathe campaign provides a 10-point plan for veterinarians that emphasizes the need for vets to educate pet owners about the health and quality of life problems faced by many brachycephalic dog breeds.

Interested in learning more about the health issues of brachycephalic dogs and the #BreedtoBreathe campaign?  Watch this short video:

 

USA Today Raises Awareness About Puppy Mills This Holiday Season

An impulse purchase of a puppy as a Christmas present helps keep puppy mills in business, warns a recent editorial in USA Today.

Buying a puppy from a brick and mortar pet store or via an online ad provides support for an industry that inhumanely breeds, transports, and sells thousands of puppies across the US.

The article notes that the parents of your cute new puppy may very well have spent their lives confined to a cage just six inches taller than the dog, with barely enough space to turn around in.

The Humane Society of the United States recently released a heartbreaking report called the “Horrible Hundred”—a list of the worst puppy mill breeders in the US.

USA Today goes on to report that recent legislative changes now block potential buyers from viewing a breeder’s inspection records on the US Department of Agriculture’s website.

If you are interested in getting a purebred puppy from a breeder, take your time and research reputable individual breeders in your geographic area.

Make an in-person visit to the breeder’s home, meet the puppy’s mother and littermates, and ask to see all health testing records.  Observe the overall condition of the place where your puppy lives.

And of course, rescuing a shelter animal is a great way to bring joy to everyone this holiday season!