Happy 4th of July!

Wishing all of our friends a happy and safe July 4th holiday!

 

Image:  Fourth of July by Jesse Michael Nix on Flickr.

 

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Dog Beach Dos and Don’ts from San Diego Humane

Here in San Diego we have quite a few dog-friendly beaches for people and their pups to enjoy.  Are you planning on bringing your dog to the beach for some fun in the sun this summer?  The San Diego Humane Society has put together a list of some helpful dog beach etiquette tips for you and your best friend!

  • Many dogs go off-leash at the beach, but keep your dog leashed if you have any concerns about her behavior towards strangers and other dogs. You should also keep your dog leashed if she doesn’t come when called!
  • Bring plenty of fresh water for your dog to drink and an umbrella to provide your dog with shade on hot, sunny days.

  • Not every dog is a good swimmer, especially certain short-muzzled and short-legged breeds like Bulldogs and Dachshunds. Start your dog out leashed in shallow water to see how he does.  Make sure to pull him from the water if he gets tired.
  • Having up to date identification like tags and microchips is especially important when your dog goes off-leash at the beach.

  • Flea and tick prevention should also be up to date before you head to the beach.
  • Rinse the sand and salt water off of your dog when you’re done, and dry her off with a walk before getting back in the car.

 

Summer Pet Safety Tips

The Summer Solstice is this Thursday, June 21st!  Summer is a great time to enjoy the outdoors with your pets, but be sure you are prepared to keep them safe when the weather is hot.

The Arizona Humane Society has created some very helpful infographics on summer pet safety…because our friends in Arizona know a thing or two about hot weather!

Check out these important tips!

And this guide to heat exhaustion in pets:

Have a safe and happy summer!

 

 

Summer Pet Safety – Dogs and Hot Cars

With the Memorial Day holiday weekend just around the corner, now is the perfect time to share an important reminder with all pet owners:  Dogs and hot cars don’t mix!

According to the ASPCA, leaving pets alone in a hot car is animal cruelty.  Pets can die from overheating in a parked car very quickly.  Certain dogs are at higher risk for heat-related illness, including:

  • Puppies
  • Senior dogs
  • Short-muzzled breeds
  • Dogs with dark and/or thick coats

Remember that on a day that feels comfortable to you, the temperature inside a car can be 20 degrees higher than the outdoor air temperature, even with the windows cracked open.

Don’t take your dog with you when you’re out running errands in your car on hot summer days.  If you see a dog left alone in a hot car, be sure to call local law enforcement or animal control right away.

 

First Aid Tips to Keep Your Pets Safe this Summer

Check out these great summer-themed first aid tips from the website PetMD.  Your pets can face all sorts of warm weather hazards like hot pavements on soft paws, an unexpected dip in the pool, insect bites and stings, and heatstroke.  Help keep your dogs, cats, and other companion animals safe this summer with these tips.

Know the signs of heatstroke and how to treat it.

Your pet can get overheated in the hot summer months.  Symptoms of heatstroke include vomiting, diarrhea, panting, fast pulse, red gums, and collapse.  If your pet’s temperature is over 104 degrees Fahrenheit, take her to a cool place immediately and begin treating with cool water (not ice water).  Bring your pet to the vet for a thorough exam, as heatstroke can cause organ damage.

Protect your pet from insect pests.

If you live in a place with a high incidence of Lyme Disease, consider having your pet vaccinated for it.  Use flea and tick prevention for dogs and cats but never administer dog treatments to your cat.  Cats are sensitive to these treatments and ones intended for dogs can be toxic to them.  You can give antihistamines for insect bites, just talk to your vet about dosage.

Be aware of the dangers of snake bites.

Bites from rattlesnakes and other venomous critters can be a hazard to your pet in the warm weather months.  Take your pet to the vet ASAP if she has been bitten by a snake or other animal.  Vets recommend not putting any topical medicines on the bite until it has been examined by an expert.

Open windows can be hazardous to your pet.

If you open your windows during the warm weather, make sure your screens are undamaged and securely in place before you let your pet sit on the windowsill.  Cats are especially likely to suffer trauma injuries from falling out of a window.   Your pet can get internal injuries as well as broken bones from a fall, so be sure to get to the vet as soon as possible.

Keep pets safe around the water.

Don’t assume your dog is an expert swimmer when you allow him to romp around the pool or take her for a boat ride.  Make sure your pet can swim and knows his way out of the pool in an emergency.  Get a pet life jacket for boat rides.  Be aware of the hazards of parasites and bacterial infections if your dog swims in a pond or river.  Pool chemicals can also irritate your pet’s eyes…and stomach, if swallowed.

Protect paw pads from hot surfaces.

Your pet can get burns on her paw pads if she walks on a hot surface like cement, or even beach sand.  Put booties on your dog’s feet for a long walk in the summer heat.  Soak your pet’s paws in cool water and talk to your vet about topical medicines to apply to the feet.  Also, pets with light colored fur can get sunburn, so keep them out of the midday sun or get them sun protection products made just for pets.

Summer foods can pose a risk to your pets.

Your pets may love the idea of hanging around your backyard barbecue, but be sure to keep an eye on them when the food is served.  Summertime favorites like corn on the cob (dogs may swallow cobs whole) and barbecue sauce (contains onion, garlic, and salt) can pose a real danger to your pet, as can alcoholic beverages.

Beware of pesticides and poisonous plants.

Keep pets off lawns that have been freshly treated with pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers.  Certain pesticides like rodent and snail bait can be very harmful, or even fatal, to your pet if ingested.  Remove mushrooms from your yard as many can be toxic to pets.