Meet FACE Success Story Luna!

Cute little Luna is a 13-week-old Border Collie mix who got sick after eating tree bark.  Our partners at Ethos Veterinary Health were treating Luna when her dad (who works 2 jobs to help make ends meet) ran out of funds during her hospitalization.

A FACE grant enabled Luna to remain in the hospital for one more day of the oxygen therapy and supportive care she needed to survive.

We’re happy to report that Luna is now doing well and on her way to a full recovery.

Did you know that some tree bark is harmful to dogs?  Here’s a list of plants that are toxic to dogs, from the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control website.

Why do some dogs love to eat tree bark?  Here’s a short video that helps explain this common canine behavior:

 

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Alternatives to Pilling a Cat

Many pets require daily medication—often in the form of pills—for chronic health problems.  While it’s easy for most pet owners to sneak a pill into a dog’s food and treats, pilling a cat can be more of a challenge.

There are some interesting alternatives to pills if you need to medicate your cat on a daily basis.  Of course, you should always talk to your veterinarian about the pros and cons of pill alternatives before deciding.

Many compounding pharmacies make veterinary medications for pets in a variety of forms.  The two most common are in the form of flavored treats and transdermal medicine that gets absorbed through the skin.

Treat meds are usually soft and chewy and come in a variety of flavors such as fish, chicken, beef, and even butter.  Most pharmacies will recommend that you store them in their original sealed packaging in the refrigerator to keep them fresh.

Transdermal meds are compounded into a gel form that you can rub into the inner part of a cat’s ear where there is little hair.  Vets call this area the pinna.

Be careful to use rubber gloves or finger cots if you apply the medication by hand.  You can also get it in the form of a pen that twists to dispense the drug onto a sponge tip that you apply to the ear.  Most vets will recommend that you alternate ears if you medicate your cat every day.

Here’s a YouTube video that shows how to apply transdermal medication to a cat’s ear:

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Meet Cheryl Passer

Cheryl at Bags & Baubles

Cheryl Passer has been a dedicated FACE volunteer for over 11 years!  Her work with FACE dates back to our earliest days as a brand-new animal charity when, as a professional graphic designer, she helped us with our logo, branding, website, and print materials.

Since then, Cheryl has helped FACE with many other design projects, either gratis or for a discounted rate.  Cheryl has also volunteered her time as well as her artistic talents, working on our two biggest annual fundraising events:  Bags & Baubles and our Invitational Golf Tournament.

A feline friend poses beside Cheryl’s work

Cheryl values her work with FACE.  “I hope that providing free or affordable design services, as well as my time volunteering at events, has helped FACE retain more money to help family pets get the medical attention that they need,” she says.

We would like to extend our sincerest thanks to this long-time member of the FACE family!  Thank you, Cheryl, for helping us save the lives of over 2,000 San Diego area pets.

 

Meet FACE Success Story Sammy!

10-year-old Sammy was in urgent need of surgery when his bladder ruptured. Sammy’s “mom” is on a fixed income and had no way of paying for the necessary procedure to save her best friend. Our friends at Mohnacky Animal Hospitals of Carlsbad contacted us to help save this sweet boy!

FACE’s network of hospital partners connects us with so many pets and their families that otherwise would not know about FACE and our mission to save pets from economic euthanasia.

Sammy received his emergency surgery and after extensive care at the hospital, was able to return home to fully recover with his mom!