Meet FACE Success Story Fenway!

This adorable furball posing with his equally adorable human family is Fenway!

Fenway got into a little trouble recently when he swallowed one of his human sister’s toys.  He needed emergency surgery to remove the obstruction.

With the help of a FACE grant, our friends at the Animal Emergency Clinic of San Diego were able to give Fenway the treatment he needed, and at a discounted rate!

Sending our best wishes to Fenway and his family for a long and happy life together!

 

Video Outlines Mental Health Crisis Among Veterinary Professionals

A sobering new video produced by Dr. Carrie Turnbull of the Staunton River Veterinary Clinic in Virginia might come as a surprise to many pet owners.

The suicide rate among veterinarians is significantly higher than the rate for the general population.  One study conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that female veterinarians are 3.5 times and male veterinarians 2.1 times as likely to die from suicide than the general population.

Dr. Turnbull notes in her video that many veterinarians tend to be high-achiever, type A personality types, and they are strongly affected by the stressors inherent in their jobs, such as unsuccessful treatments and patient deaths.

She also notes that vets can experience financial stress and many carry a significant amount of debt for years after veterinary school.

Do you have friends or family in the veterinary profession?  Dr. Turnbull recommends checking in with them to see how they are doing and if they are getting the help and support that they need.

You can watch Dr. Turnbull’s video below and learn more about this issue on the American Veterinary Medical Association’s website HERE.  There is also a Facebook group called Not One More Vet that provides help for vets in need of support.

 

Health Problems in Lop Eared Rabbits

House rabbits are becoming an increasingly popular pet among animal lovers.  Fancy rabbits, such as tiny dwarf breeds, fluffy lionheads, or floppy eared lop breeds, are top choices among rabbit fanciers.

If you’re thinking about adding a floppy eared lop rabbit to your family, check out this new research about the health issues that can go along with lop ears.

A comparison of lop eared versus erect eared rabbits has found that floppy eared rabbits have higher rates of certain ear and dental problems.  Specifically, lop eared rabbits are more likely to suffer from

  • Ear canal stenosis (narrowing of the ear canal)
  • Cerumen (ear wax buildup) leading to ear infection
  • Erythema (reddening and inflammation of ear skin)
  • Incisor pathology
  • Molar overgrowth, sharpness, and spurs

These problems can be painful and can negatively impact a rabbit’s overall quality of life, causing hearing loss and difficulty in eating.

Proper ear and dental care are important for all rabbits, and especially for lop breeds.  Be sure to talk to your veterinarian if you have any questions about ear and tooth care for your bunny.

The House Rabbit Society offers lots of helpful advice on ear care and dental care on their website as well.

 

Cute Alert! Meet FACE Success Story Coco

This adorable pup is Coco, pictured here with his very best friend!

Recently, Coco had a bad landing when he jumped off the bed and broke his leg.

Coco’s family was devastated when they heard that the cost of surgery to repair his leg was more than they could afford.

Besides raising funds on their own, Coco’s owners also reached out to FACE for help.

A grant funded by our supporters, including Life Sponsor Spearhead Captial, enabled Coco to get his needed surgery (at a discounted rate) from our friends at the Pet Emergency and Specialty Center.

Thanks to all of our friends and supporters for helping us save beloved family pets like Coco!

 

New UK Animal Welfare Report Shows Sharp Decline in Pet Vaccinations

The People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals (PDSA) is a UK charity that runs hospitals which provide free and low-cost veterinary care.  Each year they produce a report on animal well-being known as the PAW Report.

The latest PAW Report (click HERE for the full text) has been getting a lot of attention because it has found that the rate of pet vaccinations in the UK is on a sharp decline.

The PDSA estimates that over 7 million UK pets are at risk for disease because of lack of vaccination, including very young pets that are the most vulnerable.

The number of primary vaccinations received by young pets has dropped from 84% in 2016 to 66% in 2019, an 18% decrease.  32% of pets in the UK are not receiving their booster shots.

Reasons for not vaccinating cited by pet owners include:

  • Too expensive
  • Pets don’t encounter other animals
  • It’s unnecessary
  • Going to the vet is stressful for pets

The report’s authors note that the decline in pet vaccinations mirrors the decline in child vaccinations.  Many people who are reluctant to vaccinate kids and pets show skepticism about the safety and efficacy of vaccines.

According to PDSA veterinarians, “Vaccinations have helped to protect millions of pets from serious diseases. If people don’t vaccinate, we risk seeing a rise in extremely unpleasant, preventable, diseases that can cause considerable animal suffering and death.”

If you have questions or concerns about vaccinations for your dogs, cats, and other animals, be sure to talk to your veterinarian.  You can also check out the Vaccinations page of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s website for lots of helpful information.