Heartwarming Video: New Rescue Pup Brings Joy to Dog Mourning Loss of His Brother

Banksy and Hamilton were best canine companions, doing everything together until Hamilton passed away.  Banksy was deeply affected by the loss of his best friend.  His owners became very concerned, as Banksy became depressed and spent most of his time sleeping.

They decided that adding a new dog to the family might be the answer.  Enter Mochi, an adorable fluffball from Jindo Love Rescue, an organization that saves and adopts out dogs from the Korean dog meat trade.

Mochi also just happens to look like a miniature version of Hamilton!  After a successful introduction, Banksy and Mochi have become inseparable, sharing everything from toys to walks to Puppuccino drinks side by side.

Watch the adorable video from The Dodo below.  You can also follow the adventures of Banksy and Mochi (with their new friend Bowie) on their Instagram account!

 

Domestic Cats Face Dangers From Urban Coyotes

The US National Park Service recently completed a two-year study on the diet of coyotes in the Los Angeles, California area.  The results indicate that our cats could be at greater risk for being eaten by coyotes than we thought.

Researchers analyzed over 3,200 samples of coyote poop (called scat) from Los Angeles and surrounding communities.  They also compared the urban coyote samples with samples from more suburban areas that are closer to their natural habitat.

They found that the diet of urban coyotes was influenced by living so close to humans.  The coyotes routinely ate human food scraps and commercial pet food.  They also ate a lot of ornamental fruits commonly found in our gardens.

Unfortunately, free-roaming cats–and even cats allowed outside but restricted to enclosed yards–are also on the menu for urban coyotes.  Domestic cat remains were found in 20% of the scat, the third most common component after human and pet foods and ornamental fruits.

The scat of coyotes from more rural areas had only 4% of domestic cat and it also had less human and pet food and ornamental fruit remains.  Rabbits were the most common part of the non-urban coyotes’ diet.

Pet owners in areas with high numbers of coyotes should always keep their cats indoors.  Small dogs can also be at risk, so it’s important to walk your dog on leash and never leave your dog in the yard unattended.

Make sure your trash can lids are secure and avoid leaving bowls of pet food outside as well.  Experts also recommend avoiding bird feeders and ornamental fruit trees to discourage coyote visits to your back yard.

You can find a lot of helpful information on keeping your pets safe from coyotes on the Urban Coyote Initiative website HERE.

 

New Study: Escaped Pet Parrots Living Throughout the US

A study of former pet parrots living and breeding in the wild (called “naturalized” parrots) was recently published in the Journal of Ornithology.

The findings show that our escaped pet birds are living, and in many cases thriving, in nearly all US states, including those with cold climates.

56 species of naturalized parrots have been sighted living in the wild in 43 states between the years 2002-2016.  25 of these parrot species are known to be breeding in at least 23 states.

The most common pet parrot species living in the wild in the US are the Monk Parakeet, the Red-crowned Amazon, and the Nanday Parakeet.

Most naturalized parrots live in three states with relatively warm climates:  California, Florida, and Texas.

A story on this parrot study in National Geographic notes that escaped parrots can live in colder states, thanks to their nightly nesting habits and people putting out bird seed in the winter months.

Parrots live in all types of environments, from urban to rural, with many choosing to nest in man-made structures.

Here in San Diego, researchers report that we have as many as 13 parrot species living in the wild.  Locals can keep up with the latest parrot news and report sightings via the San Diego Parrot Project!

 

The 8 Most Common Canine Health Problems

A large-scale study of dogs in the UK has identified the most common canine health disorders seen by veterinarians.

The electronic health data of over 450,000 dogs under veterinary care in the UK was analyzed by researchers conducting this study.

Let’s take a look at some key findings.  Be sure to check out the full report, published in BMC Veterinary Research HERE.

The 8 most common canine health problems are:

  • Anal sac disorder
  • Conjunctivitis (eye infection)
  • Dental disease
  • Dermatitis (skin problems)
  • Overweight or obese
  • Lipoma (fatty tissue growth)
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Otitis externa (ear infection)

The researchers note that some of these health conditions are more prevalent than others, while some tend to be more severe or longer lasting than others.

Most prevalent health issues:

  • Dental disease
  • Overweight or obese
  • Anal sac disorder

Most severe health problems:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Otitis externa
  • Dermatitis

Health issues with longest duration:

  • Dental disease
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Overweight or obese

Which canine health disorders were found to have the greatest overall negative impact on a dog’s well-being?

  • Dental disease
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Overweight or obese

The good news is that many of the most common canine health problems are preventable!  Regular dental care, both at home and at the vet’s office, is essential to your dog’s dental health.

Keeping your dog at a healthy weight through proper diet and exercise can prevent obesity and other associated health problems.  A healthy body weight can also help ease the discomfort of arthritis.

Be sure to talk to your vet about ways you can work together to maintain your dog’s health and prevent these common health problems.

 

Meet FACE Success Story Zeus!

This handsome fellow is a 9 month old Siberian Husky pup named Zeus.  Zeus and his human dad were unfortunately involved in a car accident recently.  The car was totaled but luckily Zeus’s dad was unhurt.

Zeus initially seemed fine too, although he was tossed about a little in the back seat.  It was only later at home that he began to show signs that he was unwell.  His veterinarian diagnosed Zeus with intussusception, a condition where one segment of the intestines slides (or “telescopes”) into another.

Zeus required surgery to fix his urgent medical problem, and the combination of an unexpected car accident and a veterinary emergency were financially difficult for his family to handle.

With the help of a grant from FACE, Zeus was able to get the surgery he needed and is now back at home recovering with his family!