Bowled Over: What’s the Perfect Food Bowl for Your Dog?


You’d think choosing food and water bowls for your dog would be a no-brainer, right? Just pick a style and material that you like in roughly the right size for your particular dog. It’s actually more complicated than that. Experts note that there are certain types of bowls that work best for different kinds of dogs. Here’s a quick guide to picking the best bowl for your pup, courtesy of That Pet Place:


Long-nosed dogs: Breeds with long noses like Greyhounds, Collies, and Dachshunds can benefit from the extra room of a deep bowl with high sides.


Short-nosed dogs: Brachycephalic breeds like Bulldogs, Pugs, and Pekingese should be fed using shallow bowls. Short-sided bowls make it easier for them to reach the food and are also easier on the throat.


Long-eared dogs: Do you have a Basset Hound, Cocker Spaniel, or Irish Setter? Choose food and water bowls with steep sides and a narrow opening to keep those long ears clean and dry.


Tall dogs: Great Danes, Mastiffs, and other large, long-legged breeds will appreciate bowls set on raised feeder stands. They will be more comfortable and easier on the joints than bowls set on the floor. Elevated bowls are also good for three-legged dogs and dogs recovering from surgery.


Puppies: Shallow bowls work best for puppies. A bowl with high sides could press against your little guy’s throat while he’s eating.


Fast eaters: If your dog is a little too enthusiastic at dinnertime, consider buying a slow-feed bowl with a raised insert in the center. These bowls are designed to prevent the gulping of food and improve your dog’s digestion.



Fascinating Facts About Black Cats


With Halloween coming soon, October is a great time to remind potential cat adopters to consider adding a beautiful black rescue cat to your family! While some shelters and rescue groups do not feel comfortable adopting out black cats around Halloween, others use the holiday as an opportunity to spread the word about how adopting a black cat is a cool thing to do! Black cats (and dogs) are overrepresented in the shelter population, so now is the perfect time to open your heart to an animal in need.


Here are a few awesome facts about black cats, courtesy of the website Catster:

  • A black cat’s fur color can change over time. Like us humans, they can go grey as they get older, and some black fur will “rust” with exposure to the sun.
  • Solid black coloring in a cat requires both parents to carry the same black color gene. Tabby is the dominant cat coat type, so some black cats actually have faint tabby markings in their fur if you look closely at them.
  • Black cats tend to be healthier than cats of other colors. Research has shown that the genes associated with black color also make the cats’ immune systems stronger. They tend to be more resistant to diseases like FIV than other cats.
  • Black “panthers” are actually two different cat breeds, depending on where they live. In the Americas they are jaguars, and in Africa they are leopards. Like domestic cats, the black coloring in big cats is genetic.


Still need more convincing that black cats are cool? Just ask cat lover Norman Reedus of The Walking Dead (click image to enlarge):



FACE Success Story Edwin & Myles Win 2016 Animal Impact Award


San Diego Pets Magazine has chosen FACE grantee Edwin Rivers and his dog Myles for their 2016 Animal Impact Award! Edwin and Myles share a very special bond, and we are proud to be a part of their heartwarming story.

Edwin was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after his military service during Operation Desert Storm in 1990-91. Edwin received treatment for his PTSD, but nothing made more of a positive impact than when he got a 9 month old shepherd mix named Myles. Edwin took Myles in for a friend who could no longer care for him. Myles soon became a comforting presence in his life and helped ease the symptoms of his PTSD.

In 2015, Myles fell and broke his femur. He needed emergency surgery that Edwin could not afford, as he was on a fixed income. The recommended alternative was euthanasia. Edwin reached out to FACE and received a grant for the life-saving operation for Myles. Myles has now fully recovered and Edwin has become a great advocate for FACE, volunteering and speaking about how he and Myles made such a positive impact on each other’s lives.

You can read the full article HERE.


How You Can Take a Stand Against Puppy Mills


Maddie’s Fund and the Humane Society of the United States have joined forces to create the “Don’t Buy Into Puppy Mills” public awareness campaign. Visit their informative website to learn how you can help stop the cruel puppy mill industry. There are lots of things concerned animal lovers can do to make a real difference in the lives of these animals. Just click on the provided links to sign a petition, contact your local legislators, and report suspected puppy mill activity to the authorities.


Don’t forget to use the hashtag #stoppuppymills on your social media accounts and spread the word about alternative ways to find a new puppy…especially adoption!…besides pet stores and online ads. The HSUS estimates that 2 million puppies are born into mills each year. We can help reduce that number.


The campaign has created a very moving video featuring kids talking about where puppies come from which can serve as a great learning tool for anyone interested in educating the next generation about puppy mills:



Photos: FACE Foundation’s 4th Annual Doggie Dash 5K Run


Our 4th annual Doggie Dash fundraising event was held on Sunday, September 25, 2016 in sunny San Diego, California! We were fortunate to have over 150 supporters come out to run (and walk) for pets in need of life-saving emergency veterinary care…despite some very toasty weather.


Thank you to everyone who participated in this great event!


We always love to see the sporty pups (and their people) who come to the Doggie Dash. Here are some pictures for your viewing pleasure…