Heartwarming Video: Special Needs Cat Adoption

Grab a tissue before watching this heartwarming video from The Dodo.  A kindhearted couple has made it their mission to adopt special needs cats.

Members of this loving household include a sweet guy with a neurological condition that makes it hard to walk, a cat who lost her eyes to an infection, and another cat who was born with a cleft palate.

Just when they thought their family was complete, they added a fourth cat who’s missing an eye.  These sweet cats really do prove that cats are like potato chips…you just can’t stop at one!

 

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FDA Issues Updated Warning About Dog Bone Treats

The US Food and Drug Administration has recently issued a revised warning about giving your dog packaged “bone treats.”  While there are also dangers in giving your dog real bones you get from the butcher, the FDA is emphasizing the health risks of processed and packaged bone treats.

These bone treats are sold at many brick and mortar and online retail outlets.  They may be labelled as pork femur bones, ham bones, rib bones, or smoked knuckle bones.  The bones are dried by smoking or baking, and contain preservatives and flavorings.

What are the health risks of bone treats?  The FDA has received reports from veterinarians and pet owners on the following issues:

  • Gastrointestinal obstruction
  • Choking
  • Cuts and other wounds in the mouth or on the tonsils
  • Vomiting and diarrhea
  • Rectal bleeding
  • Risk of death (15 cases of dogs dying after eating bone treats have been reported)

Other problems with the treats themselves, such as mold and splinters, have also been reported.

The FDA recommends these common-sense tips to keep your dog safe around bones and bone treats:

  • Keep dishes of your food scraps that contain bones (especially small bones like chicken) out of reach of pets.
  • Monitor your dog around the trash if you throw away bones or poultry carcasses.
  • Talk to your vet about safe chew toy options (like Kongs) as a replacement for bones and bone treats.
  • Remember to supervise your dog around all chew toys and treats to prevent accidental ingestion.

 

Oreo the Cat Saves Human Sibling from Rattlesnake

We love stories about heroic pets, and this news story about a brave black and white kitty from Florida proves that cats can give dogs a run for their money in the hero department.

The Love Meow website reports that Oreo is close to his whole human family, but especially bonded with his 10-year-old sister Jaiden.

Oreo was nearby when an eastern diamondback rattlesnake got close to Jaiden and other kids playing in the backyard.  Oreo began to act strangely, alerting the children to the snake.

Brave Oreo put himself between the snake and the kids as they retreated into the house.  Unfortunately, he was bitten in the leg and had to be taken to the vet for wound care, fluids, and antibiotics.

Oreo’s treatment is going well, and the family has him home again, relieved that he will not lose his leg.  Jaiden’s Christmas wish this year?  That her heroic best friend Oreo is happy and healthy!

 

Images:  Cyndi Anderson/Love Meow

 

UC Davis Researchers Discover the Genetics Behind Disc Disease in Dogs

Many FACE financial grants for critical veterinary assistance are awarded to owners of dogs with a serious spinal condition called intervertebral disc disease (IVDD).  IVDD is a major cause of pain and paralysis in certain dog breeds, especially those with short legs like the Dachshund, French Bulldog, Corgi, Basset Hound, and Pekingese.

In IVDD, the discs in a dog’s spine can degenerate over the course of time or suddenly herniate, depending on the type of IVDD the dog suffers from.  IVDD is a painful condition that often requires surgery and physical rehabilitation.

Recently, researchers at the University of California Davis have discovered the genetic mutation responsible for chondrodystrophy, which is a genetic trait that many IVDD-prone breeds share.  It’s characterized by changes in bone growth, leading to short long bones (legs) and premature spinal disc calcification and degeneration.

The scientists report that dogs with IVDD are 50 times more likely to have this mutation.  The gene identified, the FGF4 retrogene, was found to play a key role in bone development for dogs with chondrodystrophy.  FGF abnormalities in humans can lead to conditions like dwarfism.

Identification of this mutation can help control the incidence of IVDD in dogs.  The UC Davis Veterinary Genetics Laboratory offers two genetics tests for breeders and owners of short-legged breeds prone to IVDD.  Breeders can test for IVDD risk in their dogs, identifying those that are carriers of 0, 1, or 2 copies of the gene.

 

Photos: FACE’s 6th Annual Dog-Friendly Golf Tournament!

On November 13th, we held one of our biggest annual fundraising events…our 6th Invitational Golf Tournament.

Each year, dogs and their people gather at San Diego’s Lomas Santa Fe Country Club to golf for a great cause…

…raising funds to help save the lives of San Diego area pets in need of urgent veterinary care.

Thank you to all our friends and supporters.  Enjoy some photos of happy pups at the event!